Literature-Rich Resources


As you know (or may not know), my own classroom instruction is heavily phonics-based. I teach a reading class specifically designed for students with dyslexic tendencies, and my main goal is to help support them with decoding skills. We work daily on phonemic awareness, reading strategies, and spelling through multi-sensory instructional methods. I explicitly teach phonics and spelling rules. Naturally, I design TPT products with my students in mind, and I always use those products with them as well. 

Previously, there were a couple of products for which I wrote my own little stories to coincide with other word-building activities. My students always love those! I think they just like the idea of reading authentic writing, and it's fun for them to hear something a teacher has written for a change. With that in mind, I decided to generate products that I am calling "Literature-Rich Resources for Phonics Instruction." These resources will not only contain word work activities based on a specific phonics rule, but they will also feature skill-based stories I have written as well.

This page is specifically devoted to my "Literature-Rich Resources," and I will continue to update it with previews for new products as I expand this selection. These are all available in the Tally Tales TPT store as individual products. Each description here is brief, and the images only feature the literature portions of the product. However, if interested, you can click any image or title to be redirected to my store, where you will find more details and preview images for the product.

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"A Tale of -ng and -nk" contains a fun story that may be used for instructional purposes to actually teach students that you never, ever spell these glued sounds with an e. This is often a challenging little tidbit to remember for students, and sometimes a fun tale really helps establish the rule in their memory. 


The following resources all feature short stories or poems that may be used either as teacher read-alouds when introducing a new skill or as independent student texts. Tip: You can always create an extension activity with student texts by having students highlight words that feature a specific spelling pattern throughout the text as they read. This helps isolate any "new" words that may be troublesome so students can really focus on those words to decode.



I will continue to design my products to contain relevant, skill-based literature, and I'm really excited about this direction for The Tally Tales! If you have any specific needs, please feel free to message me via my contact form. I keep an ongoing list of resource ideas, and I would love to know if there is a specific area of need! 
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